3 Advantages of Mediating a ‘Gray Divorce’

Gray divorces describe individuals who choose to get a divorce after the age of 50. These later-in-life divorces present unique issues. For one, the spouses tend to be more mature and better able to navigate their divorces peacefully and respectfully. Also, these spouses will have more assets to divide, since they’ve been working and saving for longer as a married couple.
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Gray Divorce as You Approach Retirement Age is a Fresh Start

There was a time when divorce was mainly the arena of young couples who realized they were incompatible or who experienced issues, like infidelity. Couples who had spent decades together did not choose to divorce, even if their marriages were no longer healthy and happy. That has changed in recent years, with older adults and couples with decades of marriage together choosing to seek a fresh start in their golden years. The divorce rate among couples over the age of 50 has doubled since the 1990s.
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Should You Wait for the Children’s Graduation to get Divorced

You have two kids. One is a senior in high school. The other is in eighth grade.

For three years now, you have felt terribly unhappy in your marriage. You and your spouse barely speak. You sleep in different rooms. You feel like two tenants simply renting the same house.

Over the last year, it’s only gotten worse. Your spouse insults you and digs at you emotionally all the time. So far, there has not been any physical abuse. If there were, you’d leave instantly. But it has become clear that neither of you wants this relationship to continue.
So, do you ask for a divorce now? Or should you wait until your kids are both out of school? The senior is so close, after all. Can you put up with four more years after that for your second child to head off to college?
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Marital assets and taxes: What about capital gains?

Imagine you’re in the midst of the asset division process during your divorce. You want to keep the $1 million family home and your spouse wants to keep the $1 million investment portfolio. Both are worth the same amount of money so it should be a simple process of you keeping the house, and your spouse keeping the investment portfolio — right?

Not necessarily. Capital gains taxes could apply to either the investment portfolio, the house, or, likely, both. You’ll need to consider the amount of these tax liabilities when you’re dividing your home.

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How to Know Whether or Not to File for Divorce

It’s arguably one of the most important decisions that you will ever have to make — whether to stay in a dysfunctional marriage or file for divorce. Each spouse has to come to his or her own conclusion whether to file for divorce based on the individual circumstances in the marital relationship. But there are some questions that all can ponder in order to make the right decision for all parties, including the kids.

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